Welcome to the 2019/20 season of lectures 

Arranged by Sheila Neil on behalf of the committee. 

 We hope you find them interesting and stimulating.

As a local History Society, we aim to offer more than just the lectures – although that is the main focus for us all, and enables us to meet together once a month. As in recent years, at the first meeting of the season the committee would like to take the opportunity of meeting and talking to members both old and new.

Our meetings are held in the Parish Hall, Station Road, Charing, Kent and start at 8pm.

Doors open at 7:30pm and Visitors are welcome at £3

Tea and Coffee served from 7:30pm followed by the talk at 8pm.
WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE
.

Membership (email for more details)
Adult £9 p.a.
Family membership: £16 p.a.
Full time students: free

Noticeboard

Date Lecture
Speaker
Thursday
  12 Sept
HISTORY OF THE RED ARROWS
Red Arrows pilots are amongst the most highly qualified and experienced within the Royal Air Force.  During the display season the Red Arrows perform between 75 and 85 air displays and more than 100 fly-pasts. Each pilot is hand-picked and only a very few will represent the RAF in the UK and abroad. Their Hawk aircraft are essentially the same as used by the Advanced Flying Training at RAF Valley, with the exception of smoke generators and a slightly uprated engine.  Guy will share some of their history in his one hour presentation.
Guy Bartlett
Thursday
10 Oct
VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN SCHOOLDAYS
The story of life in the classroom for both pupil and teacher in late Victorian England and up until WW1. The introduction of widespread, free and compulsory education brought with it the national curriculum and 'payment by results'. In elementary schools, life was far from easy for the teachers and pupils and there were problems with attendance, discipline, curriculum, teaching methods, etc - all made more difficult by obstructive parents amid widespread poverty.
Peter Ewart
Thursday
14 Nov
BLETCHLEY PARK AND THE BREAKING OF
THE GERMAN CODES IN WW2

The history of Bletchley Park. How it became the most important 'weapon' in the allies’ arsenal.  The breaking of the Enigma and other high-level coding machines.  Its impact on the outcome of the war.  Ian will also tell us about some of the personalities who served at Bletchley Park.
Ian Thomson
Thursday
12 Dec
CHRISTMAS SOCIAL EVENING
This will be the usual buffet with mulled wine and our quiz. This year we have been lucky enough to get a Barbershop Quartet to entertain us. They are members of the East Kent Chorus that are an acapella group from Ashford:  The Notables.
The Notables
Thursday
9 Jan
HISTORY OF SOUTH FORELAND LIGHTHOUSE -
THE FIRST TO USE ELECTRICITY FOR LIGHT  

The fully illustrated talk will start with a description of the location of the lighthouse and reasons for building it there. It will continue with a full history from the early 1630s tower to the present 1840s lighthouse, continuing to the current day, including all the technical developments that occurred there, life there during the second world war, full automation in the late 1960s and eventual closure and sale to the National Trust in the late 1980s. 
Steve Beck
Thursday
13 Feb
LIFE AND LOVES OF CATHERINE THE GREAT -
COLLECTOR AND STATESWOMAN

 She rose from nowhere to become the greatest ruler of her time. Catherine attracted scandal for the number – and age – of her lovers, and admiration for her statesmanship in equal measure, but her genius as a leader left her adopted country larger, richer, healthier and better educated than it had ever been. This illustrated talk explores her relationships, her policies and her interests: a minor German princess who moved to Russia as a young teenager and never left the country again.
Patsy Erskine-Hill
Thursday
12 Mar
KIT MARLOWE OF CANTERBURY -
PLAYWRIGHT  AND SPY
An exploration of Marlowe's associations with Kent and his dual careers as playwright and spy.
Dr Geoff Doel
Thursday
9 Apr

CANCELLED
'CREATIVE DESTRUCTION' OR 'A WICKED AGE’?
THE SUPPRESSION OF THE MONASTERIES, 1536-40

This talk argues that monasteries were vibrant and popular in late medieval England, that their suppression was one of the greatest cultural calamities in English history and was recognised as such by contemporaries.  It will also review the circumstances surrounding the preservation of monastic possessions, showing that the former monks and nuns - and in many cases their historic benefactors - hoped for the restoration of the religious life.
Dr Michael Carter
Thursday
21 May

CANCELLED
AGM